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Advanced Highway Plan Reading (New Course!)

(Request this couse)
Description
This class discusses how the highway supervisor, superintendent, maintenance worker and inspector can use a set of highway plans to ensure any new work, or roadway/structure repair work is performed according to design standards.   At the successful conclusion of the course, the student should be able to:

  • Read and interpret the information given on a set of highway plans.
  • Review plans and recognize potential maintenance problems.
  • Use the proper vocabulary to communicate about key elements of the plan.
  • Locate key items in the plan using stations.
  • Locate buried or hidden objects in the field using scaling and triangulation techniques.
  • Draw legible field sketches and red-line drawings
This course is designed as a follow-up to T2’s Blueprint Reading for Highway Workers.
 
Professional Development Hours: 6.0
 

Advanced Road Safety Audits

(Request this course)
Description
The purpose of this workshop is to provide local rural governments with an ability to develop a practical safety improvement program based upon applying the concepts of a road safety audit review. Local rural government agency personnel that may be interested in developing a safety program and applying the concepts of a road safety audit review should take this course. County Engineers and road supervisors and commissioners will find this workshop beneficial to their safety programs. The course would also be beneficial for forest service, national park, BLM, BIA, and other entities concerned with safety on rural roads.

Professional Development Hours: 7.0.


Asphalt Recycling

(Request this course)
Description
This course discusses the advantages of asphalt recycling as part of your road maintenance program. It covers techniques for recycling asphalt pavement, including surface recycling, hot mix recycling (both in plant and on-site), and cold mix recycling. The course instructed by Ed Stellfox emphasizes cold mix recycling, full depth reclamation, reviewing materials, equipment and operations. It also presents recent examples of asphalt recycling projects in several states. The following topics will be discussed: advantages; review of techniques -materials, equipment, and operations for surface recycling, hot-mix recycling, cold-mix recycling, and full depth reclamation.

Professional Development Hours: 4.0.


Asphalt Resurfacing

(Request this course)
Description
This course instructed by Ed Stellfox reviews the various asphalt mixes, their components and their uses. Asphalt resurfacing procedures are covered, including preparation, material, equipment, operation and safety. Special emphasis is placed on proper rolling and compaction of the asphalt overlay. Superpave mix design is discussed as well.

Municipal officials, road commissioners, supervisors, and superintendents; public works and maintenance personnel; equipment operators; and city or town managers are encouraged to attend.

Professional Development Hours: 4.0.


Asphalt Roads - Common Maintenance Problems

(Request this course)
Description
Municipal employees with road maintenance responsibilities should understand the causes of common maintenance problems on asphalt roads and be  familiar with proper repair materials and methods. This course instructed by Ed Stellfox discusses causes and repair procedures for common problems such as cracking, potholes, rutting, corrugations, etc. The procedures cover materials, equipment, and techniques for lasting repairs. Also included, a brief discussion of surface treatment.

Professional Development Hours: 4.0.


Asset Management For Local Governments

(Request this course)
Description
This two-day short course instructed by Alan Kercher introduces the main elements of transportation asset management (TAM) and the GASB 34 Mandate. TAM is a set of tools and approaches that has attracted significant attention over the past decade in the U.S. and internationally. The popularity of the asset management approach arises from important challenges and opportunities confronting state and local transportation agencies in the national capital region: Increased concern about security and safety Increasing traffic and congestion Advances in communication and information technologies.

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.


Basic Drainage

(Request this course
Description
This course instructed by Ed Stellfox emphasizes the importance of good drainage with discussions of water and its effects on roads, problems caused by improper drainage, and ways to handle these problems. It covers types of drainage facilities, ranging from ditches, culverts, subdrains, inlets and end structures. Their uses, materials, installation and maintenance as well as erosion control are addressed. It also introduces geosynthetic drainage applications. The following topics will be covered: importance of drainage, characteristics of water, system maintenance, drainage principles, surface and subsurface drainage, ditches, driveways, drainage culverts – materials and placement, headwalls, endwalls and inlets, erosion control, and geosynthetics in drainage.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Becoming a Successful Supervisor

(Request this course)
Description
Supervisory skills include delegation, prioritization, morale, performance evaluations, accounting, planning and personnel actions. Performing these skills properly will benefit the organization and the individual. This workshop lead by David and Janet Grouchy is designed to help public agency supervisors develop the skills they need to successfully manage, motivate, and lead people. The workshop will focus on five areas of supervisory development: Attitude, Relationships, Communication, Teamwork and Conflict Resolution, and will also include specific strategies for helping new supervisors. The format provides plenty of time for asking questions and sharing experience.

All public and private agency personnel who supervise and manage people, including county and city engineers, public works directors and managers, office managers, finance managers, managing directors, superintendents, commissioners, and consultants who work with public agencies are encouraged to participate.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Bicycle Design and Planning

(Request this course)
Description
This one-day workshop instructed by Dane Ismart will introduce plan and design concepts for the development of bicycle facilities. The course was developed to complement the AASHTO Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities. This course is targeted towards transportation planners and traffic engineers who are planning or designing bicycle facilities. Participants will receive a copy of the AASHTO Guide for Development of Bicycle Facilities and its CD.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.

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Blueprint Reading for Highway Workers

(Request this course)
Description

Today’s highway workers use a variety of blueprints and drawings to guide them in accurately performing the construction and maintenance of roadways and related components. Upon successful completion of this course instructed by Glynn Stoffel, the student will be able to read and interpret the drawings included in a set of highway plans. At the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to:
  • Recognize and define the various lines and symbols used in plan construction.
  • Describe and discuss the characteristics of plans, plats, profiles, views, details and other drawings found in a set of working plans.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use engineer’s and architect’s scales.
  • Describe how to effectively use plans in the field.
  • Obtain a score of at least 70% on the review test.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


BMP’s For Stormwater Management

(Request this course)
Description
This one-day workshop will provide municipalities, engineers, watershed and other associations with guidance and examples for the implementation and construction of cost effective BMPs for watershed protection and storm water compliance. Storm water management regulations, funding, technical approaches as well as specific innovative products and technologies will be covered. The workshop will also provide and emphasize networking opportunities for the attendees. Engineers, planners, inspectors, contractors and municipal, county, state, MS4, and watershed association staff who are involved in design, specification, construction, maintenance, and regulatory issues related to storm water management and watershed protection (including highway, site development, industrial, agricultural and landfill design) should take this course.

Professional Development Hours: 15.0.


Bridge Maintenance Inspection

(Request this course)
Description
This one day course lead by instructor John Hopkins will cover inspection of bridge maintenance. A brief summary of the topics to be covered are as follows: approach, deck maintenance, deck joints, deck drains, bearing maintenance, concrete beams, steel beams, timber beams, bridge seats and caps, piles and bents, truss maintenance, painting, and winter maintenance. The class is for the actual field maintenance worker who has to do the repairs. It is mostly concerned with what to look for from a maintenance standpoint not a structural rating perspective.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Budgeting for Public Works Departments

(Request this course)
Description
This course is designed to give public works managers some tools for developing a realistic budget and to present techniques for "selling" your budget, getting others to "buy into it", and help to promote it. Participants will also receive tips for dealing with the challenges of today's economy, the whims of Mother Nature, and the honest delivery of contracted services and materials. The workshop  is a good introduction to budgeting for those responsible for developing and presenting public works budgets. Designed to assist public works directors, foreman and supervisors, select board members, elected officials and decision makers, and others with budgeting responsibilities.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Conducting and Evaluating Regional Corridor Studies (New Course!)

(Request this course)
Description
This course will be a two-day “how-to” practical overview for professionals – either to conduct a regional arterial corridor analysis, or how to evaluate work that has already been done. 

Instructor Paul Hershkowitz will cover the regional corridor analysis process – for example, why a corridor evaluation is necessary, the steps in a regional corridor evaluation, definition of terms, how to perform the work, key issues to address,
“do’s and don’ts” (lessons learned), how to phase improvement recommendations, and sample problems to solve. By the end of the second day participants should have an overall understanding of the necessary
tools to conduct and/or review a regional arterial corridor study.
 
Attendees: This course is intended for transportation engineers and planners who are involved with the technical and policy aspects of roadway improvements.
 
Professional Development Hours: 12.0
 

Construction Inspection for Local Agency Employees

(Request this course)
Description
This one day session instructed by John Hopkins will cover some of the major duties and responsibilities of an individual responsible for the quality of a project. It will address the importance of understanding the plans, the contract, the order of operations, the materials to be used and the various quality control tests used in project inspection. This course is presented in a straight forward manner and deals with the reality of everyday factors involving contractors and agencies. Qualified field inspection personnel with one to three years of field experience are encouraged to attend; participants must possess basic math skills in geometry and algebra.

*Participants should bring a calculator, scale and straight edge; notebooks will be provided.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0


Construction Inspection-Intermediate Level

(Request this course)
Description
An intermediate class instructed by John Hopkins focuses on the construction, inspection, measurement and testing of materials associated with road way construction. Includes real-life scenarios and problems faced on the job, and covers general practices and MD standards. Qualified field inspection personnel with one to three years of field experience are encouraged to attend; participants must possess basic math skills in geometry and algebra. A test will be administered to acquire class credit. Participants should bring a calculator, scale and straight edge; notebooks will be provided.

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.

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Construction Mathematics

(Request this course)
Description
Construction inspectors may need to brush up on math skills specifically related to construction inspection, especially basic geometry, fractions, area, volume and conversions. The class lead by Ed Stellfox is a good refresher, and excellent preparation for the construction inspection class. The course was designed for road workers, foremen, superintendants, construction inspectors and supervisors in need of a refresher, especially in preparation for the Construction Inspections class.

Depending on the interest of the participants, the course may cover: whole number and fractions, decimals (for measurement and payment), mixed operation fractions and decimals, formula evaluation, techniques of algebra, ration and proportion, percentage, hints for problem solving, useful formulas, square and square roots, conversion, and transportation construction examples.

*Participants should bring a calculator, scale and straight edge; notebooks will be provided.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Crash and Safety Data Analysis

(Request this course)
Description
This day and a half course instructed by Dane Ismart will cover the following:

  • Crash Data and Computation of Crash Frequency - Using several years data, establish crash rates to compare with similar locations, while explaining hazard indices, conflict analysis, and warrant analysis.
  • Condition Diagramming and Collision Types - Review the process and the elements contained in a condition diagram and use police reports to identify the type, times, conditions or crashes on a collision diagram.
  • Speed Analysis and Traffic Calming - Methods for conducting speed studies, including data collections, sample size, computation of mean, 85th percentile and pace speeds, and controlling speed with traffic calming techniques.
  • Sight Distance Analysis - Methods for determining minimum stop and sight distances will be covered, to check whether sight distances for exercise area are adequate, or should be made improved to be adequate.
  • Pedestrian Safety - Design features such as signing, marking, timing for intersection crossings, crosswalk widths, minimum sidewalk standards including radius, ramps, and specialized HAWK pedestrian crossing.
  • School Crossing Considerations - Review school crossing mitigation measures including school guard criteria, school signs and markings, speed zones, gap analysis, and school crossing signalization.
  • Marking and Signing Considerations - Review marking designs and requirements, including sign design and location requirements as well as both longitudinal and traverse markings specifications according to the MUTCD.
  • Safety Design Issues and Mitigation - Introduce the concept of Improving safety through improved access design and applying them to identify mitigation measures for improving real and potential safety problems.
  • Presentation - Following provided guidelines, each team will present their findings as part of a television interview.

This course is intended for Traffic Engineers, planners, traffic analysts, traffic signal technicians and local officials involved in the planning or design of transportation facilities.

Professional Development Hours: 10.0


Critical Lane Analysis

(Request this course)
Description
This course will cover the critical lane analysis procedure prescribed by the Maryland counties of Montgomery, Prince George's and Anne Arundel and will also examine other capacity techniques which analyze the critical lane or movement. The course provides comprehensive coverage of the topic through lecture and problem solving. Due to the level of the subject coverage, participants should have a background in basic engineering principles. This course is designed for persons having Traffic Engineering responsibilities. It is oriented specifically to engineers and other individuals who are involved in traffic impact analysis and comparative capacity analysis techniques.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Design Of Stormsewer Management Systems

(Request this course)
Description
Learn basic hydrology and hydraulic design of stormwater management facilities with an emphasis on conventional Best Management Practices (BMP's). We will discuss various types of practices including detention/retention, infiltration, and filtration systems. Learn how to develop a hydrograph, determine storage requirements, design release structures and perform hydrologic routing.  The two-day course will include design procedures used in the Maryland Stormwater Design Manual.  This course focuses on design practices and is not intended to address policy issues. This course was designed for Engineers, Technicians, and Planners involved with the design of stormwater management facilities, review of plans submitted by consultants and developers, and those responsible for selection and evaluation of BMP's. If you attended Drainage Design and Design of Storm Sewer Systems, you don't want to miss this class.

Professional Development Hours: 15.0.


Designing Pedestrian Facilities for Accessibility

(Request this course)

Description

Upon completion of this course instructed by Juan M. Morales, P.E., the participant will be able to identify applicable laws, regulations, guidelines, and standards pertaining to accessibility for persons with disabilities. Know the requirements for ensuring accessibility in existing facilities vs. work in new construction and alterations. Identify some of the challenges in the Public Right-of-Way (PROW) faced by persons with disabilities. Review design elements necessary for achieving accessibility in the PROW, including work zones. Identify best practices. There will be (weather permitting) a field visit to a nearby intersection to assess its design and accessibility. Topics covered in the course include: 

  • Laws, Regulations, and Pedestrian Characteristics
  • Pedestrian Access Routes
  • Curb Ramps and Other Transitions
  • Detectable Warning Surfaces
  • Pedestrian Crossings
  • Accessible Pedestrian Signals
  • Pedestrian Facilities and Temporary Pedestrian (TPAR) in Work Zones
  • Field Visit

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.


Designing Safer Roads for Pedestrians and Vulnerable Road Users

(Request this course)

Description
Vulnerable road users (VRU) are susceptible to traffic injuries and fatalities, perhaps more so than drivers. Yet we design highways for the mobility of cars sometimes neglecting the needs of the most vulnerable, such as pedestrians, bicyclists, motorcyclists, transit users and others. This course instructed by Juan M. Morales, P.E. will teach participants how to diagnose pedestrian (and other VRU) safety deficiencies and select the appropriate countermeasures to make conditions safer for all users including an overview of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA)accessibility requirements. Engineering countermeasures will be emphasized but education and enforcement countermeasures will also be covered.

Upon Completion of the Course, Participants Should be Able to: Define vulnerable road users, Describe VRU needs, Diagnose crash causes and select proper countermeasures, Identify safety-related geometric design elements, and Discuss VRU safety issues and how to address them.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Drainage Management Systems

(Request this course)
Description
Municipalities need to know the location and condition of their storm water assets to develop and update their management plan. Software can help in that process. This training led by Alan Kercher covers the basics of storm water management, an overview of the software program, the creation of a project map, collection of drainage structure inventory, report generation, and analyzing potential problem areas. The demonstration will have a series of examples used for instruction. Local road managers, municipal engineers, public works employees, and town administrators are encouraged to participate. This course is designed to cover the drainage management software program, not a design manual.

Professional Development Hours: 5.0.


Excavation and Trenching Safety (New Course!)

 
Description
Municipal workers should understand the hazards and how to work safely around trenches and other excavations.  Using OSHA Regulation 29 CFR, 1926.650 as a guide, this class instructed by Glynn Stoffel discusses excavation work hazards, the role of the Competent Person, soil classification methods and testing, cave-in protection systems and their installation, and how to inspect and make safe areas where excavation is conducted.
Audience: Transportation superintendents, supervisors, public works maintenance personnel, equipment operators, inspectors, and anyone who may be involved in underground operations are encouraged to attend this course.
 
Professional Development Hours: 6.0

Flagger Certification

(This course is scheduled for November 9, 2017)
Description
The safety of workers, motorists and pedestrians is dependent upon the flaggers' performance. Since the flagger position involves safety, proper training is vital; flaggers are expected to pass a test to prove their proficiency and competence level. A MD SHA-approved ATSSA (American Traffic Safety Services Association) flagger card will be issued upon satisfactory completion of this course. This will be valid for 4 years and is acceptable in several states, including MD, VA and DC.
The class instructed by Juan M. Morales, P.E. is presented in PowerPoint© and will include a 25-question multiple choice exam and a flagger demonstration (dexterity test).  Students will receive their ATSSA Flagger Certification card the day of the course (upon passing the exam).

The course is intended for anyone whose actions affect safety of contemporary traffic control work zones, including traffic managers, traffic technicians, inspectors and designers.

Professional Development Hours: 4.0.

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Geometric Design

(Request this course)
Description
This one-day workshop instructed by Dane Ismart will introduce plan and design concepts for the development of bicycle facilities.  The course will introduce planning and design concepts for the development of bicycle facilities.  The course was developed to complement the AASHTO Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities. This course was designed for transportation planners and Traffic Engineers who are planning or designing bicycle facilities.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0


Gravel Road Maintenance

(Request this course)
Description
This course instructed by Ed Stellfox addresses basic maintenance techniques for unpaved and gravel roads. Topics include road materials, blading or dragging, reshaping or regrading for proper crown, regraveling, stabilization or full-depth reclamation, and dust control, with an introduction to road management techniques.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0


Highway Capacity Analysis

(Request this course)
Description
This course instructed by Dane Ismart provides a working knowledge on the basics of capacity analysis and the use of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) and Highway Capacity Software.  The course includes lectures and sample problems. Topics addressed will cover the analysis of a wide range of facilities from freeway systems to signalized and unsignalized intersections. Design issues and their effect on capacity will be covered as well as the major changes in the latest version of the Highway Capacity Software.  In this course you will hear how the methodologies were developed. Engineers, planners, traffic analysts, traffic signal technicians and local officials involved in the planning or design of transportation facilities are encouraged to participate.

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.


Highway Capacity Interrupted Flow

(Request this course)
Description
This one-day course instructed by Dane Ismart will cover the theory and methodology of the 2010 Highway Capacity Manual for interrupted flow. The Chapters that will be covered include:

  • Signalized Intersections
  • Unsignalized Intersections (A) Two-Way Stops (B) Four Way Stops
  • Urban Arterial

Changes in each of the interrupted Chapters of the 2010 Highway Capacity Manual will be highlighted during the lectures. The Highway Capacity Software will be demonstrated to the class using sample problems. The new roundabout capacity procedure is covered under a separate course.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Highway Capacity Manual PE Review

(Request this course)

This class is designed for individuals who want to review the Highway Capacity Manual in preparation for taking the PE Exam.  The three-day course will review traffic flow characteristics, interrupted, and uninterrupted flow.  Sections cover will include the procedures for signalized and unsignalized (two way, all way, and roundabouts) intersections, freeway facilities, freeway, multilane, weaving, ramp, and rural highways. Emphasis will be placed on explaining the principles behind the HCM and making sure the participants are familiar with the Manual.  The class will participate in a series of manual exercises and workshops to improve their familiarity with the procedures. 

Who Should Attend:  Engineers who are planning to take the PE Exam  as well as staff who wish to become familiar with the Highway Capacity Manual.

Agenda:

Day 1
8:30 AM Introduction
9:00 AM Traffic Flow Characteristics
10:15 AM Break
10:30 AM Signalized Intersections
1:00 PM Signalized Intersections Continued
2:00 PM Manual Workshop
3:00 PM Break
3:15 PM Unsignalized Intersections
4:30 PM Adjourn

Day 2
8:30 AM Unsignalized Intersections Continued
9:45 AM Break
10:00 AM Manual Unsignalized Intersection Workshops
11:00 AM Multilane Highways
1:00 PM Freeway Basic Sections
2:15 PM Adjourn
2:30 PM Multilane and Freeway Basic Section Manual Workshops
4:30 PM Adjourn

Day 3
8:30 AM Weaving
10:15 AM Break
10:30 AM Ramps
1:00 PM Weaving and Ramp Manual Workshops
2:30 PM Break
2:45 PM Freeway Facilities
3:30 PM Two Lane Rural Roads
4:30 PM Adjourn

Professional Development Hours: 18.0


Highway Capacity Uninterrupted Flow

(Request this course)
Description:
This one-day course instructed by Dane Ismart will cover the theory and methodology of the 2010 Highway Capacity Manual for uninterrupted flow.  The Chapters that will be covered include:

  • Basic Freeway Sections
  • Weaving
  • Ramps
  • Multilane Highways
  • Two Lane Rural Roads

Changes in each of the uninterrupted Chapters of the 2010 Highway Capacity Manual will be highlighted during the lectures. The Highway Capacity Software will be demonstrated to the class using sample problems.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Intersection Signal & Design Analysis

(Request this course)
Description
This course instructed by Dane Ismart will have broad general coverage of at-grade intersection analysis and design features. The analysis will include signalized, unsignalized and roundabout intersections. Specific coverage will include capacity, analysis, signal warrants, queue analysis and safety selected design features. Software packages such as HCS and SIDRA will be demonstrated. This course is targeted for municipal engineers; public works directors; state, federal, and private engineers; planners, designers, and traffic engineers that may be involved in the selection and design of intersections.

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.


Introduction to Access Management

(Request this course)
Description
Traffic engineers have long recognized that eliminating unexpected conflicts and separating decision points improves safety.  Access control reduces the number the number, and spacing of events and driveways.  The greatest benefits are significantly reduced crash rates, less congestion, and higher capacity.  

This course introduces the participants to the principles and techniques as contained in TRB’s Access Management Manual.  The course covers such issues such as median design, driveway spacing, signal spacing, cross street design at interchanges, left turn and right turn lanes, and joint and interconnected driveways.   Examples of good practice are presented to the class.  A series of short class exercises are included in the course.  Mr. Dane Ismart is the instructor for this one-day course.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Introduction to Geosynthetics

(Request this course)
Description
This course is an introduction to geosynthetics, beginning with a discussion of geosynthetics, what they are, how they are made and how they can be used in a road maintenance program. The course then looks at other geosynthetics and their road system uses, including geogrids, geocells and geowebs, presenting new materials with new applications. Designed for municipal officials, road commissioners, supervisors, and superintendents; public works and maintenance personnel; equipment operators; and city or town managers. This course instructed by Ed Stellfox, will cover the following topics: history; materials (geotextile fabrics, geogrids, geocells and geowebs); uses and applications of drainage, erosion control, reinforcement, separation, and reflective crack control.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Introduction to Highway Work Zones in Urban Areas

(Request this course)
Description
This two-day course instructed by Juan M. Morales, P.E. will introduce participants to temporary traffic control (TTC) in urban work zones. It is designed to give participants a complete overview of temporary traffic control in urban work zones, including applicable standards, devices used, component parts and their requirements, and installation/removal considerations. Emphasis will be given to considerations and issues that affect urban work zones, such as restricted space, reduced visibility, signals, businesses, pedestrians, utility operations, and others, and potential adjustments.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Introduction to Temporary Traffic Control

(Request this course)
Description

An introductory course to temporary traffic control (TTC)  in highway work zones. This one-day course instructed by Juan M. Morales, P.E. is designed to give participants a complete overview of TTC in work zones, including applicable standards, guidelines, traffic control devices, component parts and their requirements, installation/removal considerations, and pedestrian accessibility. This course will prepare participants to take the Maryland SHA Traffic Manager’s course.
 
Topics Covered/Agenda:

  • Introduction to temporary traffic control (TTC)
  • Quantification of the work zone safety problem
  • Standards and guidelines applicable in the State of Maryland (MD SHA)
  • Fundamental principles of TTC
  • Component parts of the TTC zone
  • Temporary traffic control devices
  • Tapers and other transitions 
  • Installation and removal considerations
  • Pedestrian accessibility

The instructor will briefly cover the use of temporary portable rumble strips in work zone areas.

The course is intended for anyone whose actions affect safety on temporary traffic control work zones, including traffic managers, traffic technicians, inspectors and designers.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Low Cost Safety Improvements

(Request this course)
Description
This course instructed by Mark Hood, P.E., provides participants with methods for implementing effective, low cost safety improvements targeted at high crash areas. It emphasizes the basic and enhanced application of traffic control devices, low cost safety improvements, and their specific safety benefit (crash reduction factors). Traffic crash data collection, identification of hazardous locations, and engineering study procedures are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on low cost solutions that may be made at the local level.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Managing Utility Cuts

(Request this course)
Description
One of the most aggravating occurrences undermining the structural stability of a newly constructed or resurfaced road is the utility repair. This course covers the management of roadway excavations by contractors and utilities through local ordinances or statutes, permits and fees, specifications and proper inspection. State procedures for state roads will be reviewed along with Miss Utility one call requirements, trenching and shoring, and work zone traffic control. The use of flowable fill will be discussed. The session ties everything back to liability and good risk management and closes with tips on program development and implementation.

This course was designed for engineers, inspectors, technicians, supervisors, and local officials involved with the construction and maintenance of roadways, or the inspection of roadway work utilities, and is targeted towards those agencies and jurisdictions which do not have established procedures for permits and inspections of roadway work by utilities and others. It is also appropriate for those that may be revising existing procedures.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


NEW 2010 Highway Capacity Manual

(Request this course)
Description
This three-day workshop instructed by Dane Ismart has been developed for transportation professionals interested in the latest updates and software applications to the 2010 HCM. In addition to a general overview, each procedure will be presented to highlight the changes in the 2010 HCM in comparison with the HCM2000. A detailed demonstration of the HCS 2010 will be included to illustrate how the new methods will be implemented in software. Special attention will be given to those procedures that will change most, including Signalized Intersections, Urban Streets, Roundabouts and Freeway Weaving. The Highway Capacity Software (HCS) will be previewed to demonstrate the new features being implemented in the 2010 version.

Professional Development Hours: 18.0.


The New MD MUTCD One Day Seminar

(Request this course)
Description
This one-day training is to enable participants to become familiar with the new MD MUTCD regarding the application of its principles to their traffic control devices in Maryland.  As of February 3rd, 2012, the new Maryland Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MDMUTCD) has been officially adopted by the State of Maryland.  The workshop, instructed by Dane Ismart, is open to representatives of all traffic engineering and planning organizations and elected officials.  Part of the workshop is also geared towards Local Administrators and Elected Officials.  Agenda will include compliance days for new and existing traffic control devices, new sections within various chapters of the manual, other changes in standards and guidance, procedure for experimentation and interpretation, etc.

Who should attend: State and Local Transportation Engineers, Traffic Engineers, Planners, Elected Officials, and Traffic Engineering Consultants responsible for the placement and maintenance of uniform traffic control devices in Maryland. Sponsors: This workshop is presented by the Maryland T2 Center and is sponsored by The Maryland State Highway administration (SHA) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Pedestrian & Bicycle Accommodation

(Request this course)
Description
This workshop taught by Dane Ismart covers:

  • The criteria bicyclists used to measure how well bicycle facilities meet their needs.
  • The latest 2010 HCM procedures for determining the LOS of both bicycle and pedestrian facilities.
  • The factors needed to provide a safe and comfortable bicycle trip.
  • Various types of bicycle facilities including share paths and their design criteria.
  • The proper markings and stripings for bike lanes.
  • The placement and design of bike lanes at intersections.
  • The design of bike lanes through interchanges.      

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.

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Project Development for Federal-Aid Projects (How Not to Become Non-Participating)

(Request this course)
Description
State DOTs and local agencies when developing projects involving federal-aid must follow a prescribed set of rules, regulations, and procedures. This course will cover the various steps necessary to meet the federal requirements. The course will be initiated with a discussion of categorical funds and what activities they are eligible for. A detailed presentation will be made on how the federal highway financial system works and the process that determines the amount of federal funds that will be available to the States and MPOs. Presentations will then be made on federal rules to meet planning and environmental requirements, right-of- way rules and requirements (the Uniform Act), design standards, the bridge inspection program requirements. Federal contract requirements will also be presented that discuss a broad of issues such as use of proprietary materials, contract bidding rules, contract provisions, etc. Class exercises will be used to demonstrate typical real life issues involving the development of federal-aid projects. 

Who Should Attend: State DOT and local staff and officials involved in the development of transportation projects using federal-aid funds.
 
Professional Development Hours: 12.0

Project Development with Federal Aid

(Request this course)
Description
State DOTs and local agencies when developing projects involving federal-aid must follow a prescribed set of rules, regulations, and procedures. This course instructed by Dane Ismart will cover the various steps necessary to meet the federal requirements. The course will be initiated with a discussion of categorical funds and what activities they are eligible for.  A detailed presentation will be made on how the federal highway financial system works and the process that determines the amount of federal funds that will be available to the States and MPOs. Presentations will then be made on federal rules  to meet planning and environmental requirements, right-of-way rules and requirements (the Uniform Act), design standards, the bridge inspection program requirements.  Federal contract requirements will also be presented that discuss a broad of issues such as use of proprietary materials, contract bidding rules, contract provisions, etc. Class exercises will be used to demonstrate typical real life issues involving the development of federal-aid projects.
This course is intended for State and Local Government personnel involved with federal funded projects.

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.


Road Diets (Road Configuration) Workshop - New Course!

(This course is scheduled for September 29, 2017)
Description
The course instructed by Dane Ismart covers the design, safety, and operations of road diets.  Road diets, although they come in many different designs, reduce the number of through lanes and allocate excess roadway width to parking, bicycle lanes, freight movements, and transit operations.  The classical design reduces a 4-lane undivided highway to three lanes consisting of one through lane in each direction and a continuous two lane left turn in the middle.  A road diet may also reduce the widths of lanes as well when appropriate. The advantages, disadvantages, various road diet configurations, guidance, and criteria for determining the feasibility of implementing a road diet are discussed.  Safety and operational considerations as well as examples of actual case studies are part of the course.  The after results of example corridors that are renovated and redesigned as road diets are presented.  The course is concluded with the class broken up to teams that work on a corridor problem and present their solution and road diet design. 
 
Audience: This Workshop will be of interest to Engineers, Transportation Planners, Pedestrian and Bicycle Coordinators, Safe Routes to School Coordinators, Local Public Agency Coordinators, and Transportation Alternatives Program Managers.
 
Professional Development Hours: 6.0.
 

Road Safety 365 - A Safety Workshop for Local Governments

(Request this course)
Description
This course instructed by Juan M. Morales, P.E. is designed to provide local and rural agencies with practical and effective ways to mainstream safety solutions into their day-to-day activities and project development process. This one-day workshop focuses on processes for incorporating safety into all aspects of local and rural projects, and on making safety a priority through inclusion in the traditional decision-making process - 365 days a year. The course stresses the importance of road safety, and illustrates how it can be integrated into rural/local transportation project development at all stages: planning, design, construction, implementation, operations, and maintenance. Through practical exercises and facilitator-led discussions, the emphasis is on operations and maintenance to reflect the predominant, day-to-day responsibilities of rural/local transportation agencies. The benefits and potential cost savings of safety initiatives are shown using examples from rural/local agencies.

The workshop audience ranges from decision-makers to road crews. It is aimed primarily at local and rural road and public works supervisors. Others who would benefit include: elected officials, public safety advocates, State DOT personnel, law enforcement, consultants, regional and rural development organizations, municipal associations.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Road Safety Audits

(Request this course)
Description
The purpose of this workshop is to provide local rural governments with an ability to develop a practical safety improvement program based upon applying the concepts of a road safety audit review. The target audience is local rural government agency personnel that may be interested in developing a safety program and applying the concepts of a road safety audit review.  County Engineers and road supervisors and commissioners will find this workshop beneficial to their safety programs. The course would also be beneficial for forest service, national park, BLM, BIA, and other entities concerned with safety on rural roads.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Roadway Safety Fundamentals

(Request this course)
Description
This one-day course instructed by Mark Hood will cover the following topics:

  • Basics of road safety: why, when, and where crashes occur
  • Solving fundamental traffic safety problems
  • Using traffic control devices to improve safety: signs, signals, pavement markings, and maintenance
  • Common roadway safety issues: curves, stopping sight distance, edge drop-offs, etc.
  • Basic Intersection Safety

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Road Surface Management

(This course is cheduled for October 18, 2017)
Description
This course instructed by Ed Stellfox provides participants with the basic concepts of road surface management including inventory, distress identification, condition survey, strategies, programs, budgets, and field surveys. A Road Surface Management Systems software demonstration will also be conducted during this course.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.

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Roadway Surface Management Systems (RSMS)

(Request this course)
Description
The RSMS is a network pavement management systems (PMS) course intended to provide an overview and rough estimate of a roadway system's condition and the approximate costs of future improvements. Participants will learn how to use RSMS software to define a road network, assign the condition of the road sections, program repair and maintenance alternatives, develop cost estimates, prioritize rehabilitation and maintenance needs, and get the most out of the RSMS reporting capabilities.
Designed for municipal and small country networks this introductory course instructed by Alan Kercher teaches you how to load the software, input data, conduct a condition survey, modify the software ton meet local conditions and practices, and to generate analysis and reports. A great course to take if you are new to the pavement management system, field inspections, or RSMS.

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.


Roundabout Planning and Design

(Request this course)
Description
This one-day workshop lead by Dane Ismart will highlight the new procedure to roundabouts as per the NEW 2010 Highway Capacity Manual. Topics covered in the roundabout course will include geometric design, signing, striping, safety, and accommodation of pedestrians and bicyclists. An important component of the course will be a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of roundabouts. HCS 2010 software will be used to demonstrate the US Roundabout Capacity procedure rather than SIDRA and Rodel. Maryland’s Roundabout Guide will also be discussed and included as part of the course. Transportation Planners and Traffic Engineers who are planning or designing a modern roundabout are encouraged to participate.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0


Safe Work Practices On and Around Heavy Equipment (New Course!)

Jobs requiring heavy equipment demand that all persons on the job recognize the hazards that exist when operating and working around this equipment.  The class provides a comprehensive overview of how to safely operate and work with the equipment used in highway and utility construction and maintenance work.
 
The subjects covered include:
  • OSHA standards for heavy equipment
  • Job site hazard recognition and abatement 
  • Safe operation of backhoes, excavators and graders
  • Safe operation of front-end and skid-steer loaders
  • Hand signals and other communication techniques
  • Safely working around heavy equipment
  • Safely working around dump trucks and other mobile equipment
  • Safe excavation techniques
  • Safe rigging and lifting techniques 
  • Safe street driving and transport of heavy equipment
Professional Development Hours: 6.0

Safety through Access Management 

(Request this course)
Description

Traffic engineers have long recognized that eliminating unexpected events and separating decision points simplifies the driving task.  Since access control reduces the number, complexity, and spacing of events to which the driver must respond, it results in improved traffic operation and reduces accidents.  Other benefits include reduced delay, improved traffic flow, increased capacity, and improved fuel economy.  This course covers not only why, but also how to manage access, from a policy, legal, and design perspective. This two-day short course instructed by Dane Ismart coveres the following topics:

  • Access management policies
  • Access design principles
  • Trip generation
  • Access management techniques
  • Retrofit programs
  • Access and median design guidelines
  • Site plans and access for major activity centers
  • Evaluation of improvements
  • Workshops

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.


School Crossing Design & Safety Analysis (New Course!)

Description
 
The School Crossing Design Course instructed by Dane Ismart will cover the recommended guidelines for school crossings.  Various issues such as determining the school area boundaries, signing and markings for school crossing areas, and design criteria will be covered.  Requirements and guidelines as covered by the Maryland MUTCD will be reviewed as part of the class.  How to select treatments such as potential signalization, crossing guards, pedestrian cross walks, coverage, school speed zones and speed monitoring, location of traffic control devices, and warrants will be presented to the class. The Safe Routes to School program will be reviewed. Sources for information and school crossing information will be given to the class as well as innovative school treatments from other states.   A class exercise will be conducted by the partricipants to demonstrate the application of the procedures and design principles for implementing school crossing treatments.   
 
Audience: Local and state planners and designers, school officials and associations involved in school transportation, and transportation consultants. 
 
Professional Development Hours: 6.0

Seal coates, Oil and Chip, Slurry Seals, Microsurfacing and other Methods of Preserving your Asphalt Pavements

(Request this course)
Description
This course is the first step in making your asphalt pavements last longer at lower costs. The course instructed by Ed Stellfox covers preventive maintenance treatments such as chip seals, slurry seals, and micro-surfacing and discusses when and where each technique could be effective. It presents application methods, including preparation, materials, equipment, operations and safety, along with practical tips on how to avoid trouble.
This course is open to municipal officials, road commissioners, supervisors, and superintendents; public works and maintenance personnel; equipment operators; and city or town managers.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Selected Topics In Highway Design & Safety

(Request this course)
Description
This two-day course will cover several aspects of highway design and safety. Some selected topics include cross-section, super-elevation, spiral design, vertical alignment, and sight distance design. The course will also explore determining speed profiles, passing and delay on two-lane highways, design consistency estimates and safety as well as infrastructure coefficient and its relationship to crashes. This workshop is targeted to traffic operations engineers, highway design engineers, and planners in the private and public sectors.

Professional Development Hours: 20.0.


Sign Inventory Management Systems

(Request this course)
Description
Motorists rely on traffic signs to regulate, warn, and guide themselves and others. The courts have consistently held governmental entities responsible for adequate placement and maintenance of traffic signs. The Sign Inventory Management System was developed to help effectively maintain traffic signs and document the effort at the same time. As a management system, SIMS goes beyond a simple inventory to include repair decisions, priority analysis, repair options, and parts management. A SIMS training/users manual and SIMS software will be provided. This class instructed by Alan Kercher was designed for local road managers from small to medium size municipalities; individuals who conduct inventories and condition assessments; SIMS computer operators and data base managers.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0, for more information about PDHs, visit our FAQ page.

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Signalized Intersection

(Request this course)
Description
This two-day course instructed by Dane Ismart, Signalized Intersection will cover the Highway Capacity Manual procedures for evaluating signalized intersections. The methodologies used to calculate signalized intersection capacity will be discussed in detail. The course will also demonstrate how design and safety should be considered and coordinated when considering intersection capacity. Comparisons between signalized and unsignalized intersection's (two-way and four-way stops, and roundabouts) capacity and delays will be made and discussed. MUTCD warrants for signalized intersections will be reviewed.

As part of the course, the class will conduct a field study and collect intersection field data and delay. After the field study, the class will conduct a capacity analysis. Capacity software computer programs such as HCM, SIDRA, and Synchro will be demonstrated and used to estimate the capacity of the intersection visited as part of the field study.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Signalized Intersection Design and Timing

(Request this course)
Description
This course reviews the Highway Capacity Manual procedure for determining the capacity and level of service for signalized intersections.  In the course we explore the impacts of cycle length, progressive timing, phasing, left turn treatments, NEMA movements, storage areas and queueing, approach volumes, blockages such as parking and buses, green times, and lost times on the operations of a signalized intersection.  As part of the course in the afternoon the class goes to a field site and collects information at a selected signalized intersection.  The field data is then used by the class to calculate the delay and level of service using the HCS software.  Variations to the cycle length, timing, and phasing are explored to determine the optimize settings that minimize delay and improve the level of service. 

Who should attend:  Engineers and planners who want a better understanding between the characteristics of signals and timing and levels of service and control delay. 

Professional Development Hours: 6.0

Registration Fees: There is a $110 registration fee for all participants.


To Signalize or not to Signalize
(Signal Warrant and Intersection Control Analysis)

(Request this course)
Description
The To Signalize or Not To Signalize Course instructed by Dane Ismart covers the MUTCD criteria for determining whether the installation of a traffic control signal is justified at a particular location. The course includes an analysis of the factors for existing operations and safety at study locations and the potential to improve these conditions. The following warrants are discussed in detail and include:

  • Warrant 1 – Eight-Hour Vehicular Volume
  • Warrant 2 – Four-Hour Vehicular Volume
  • Warrant 3 – Peak Hour
  • Warrant 4 – Pedestrian Volumes
  • Warrant 5 – School Crossing
  • Warrant 6 – Coordinated Signal System
  • Warrant 7 - Crash Experience
  • Warrant 8 – Roadway Network
  • Warrant 9 – Intersection Near a Railroad Grade Crossing
The course will also cover warrants for four-way stops as well as alternatives to traffic control signals. A detailed discussion of the advantages and disadvantages both in the terms of capacity and safety of various types of traffic controls will be presented. The basis for both the installation and the removal of traffic control devices will be discussed.
 
As part of the course, workshop problems will be given to the class participants. The class will be provided intersection field data and will determine if signals are warranted for the sample intersections. After completing the intersection analysis. MUTCD signal analysis software will be demonstrated and the workshop problems will be evaluated based on the microcomputer analysis.
 
Who Should Attend: Traffic Engineers and transportation planners involved in the design and planning of corridors and intersections.
 
Professional Development Hours: 6.0.

Site Impact Analysis

(This course this scheduled for September 27, 2017)
Description
This course will cover the ITE Trip Generation Report and ITE’s procedure for conducting a traffic impact study.  The content includes discussions on site impact methodology, development of background traffic, evaluation of existing and future conditions, trip generation rates, trip distribution, mode split, traffic assignment, and impact mitigation strategies.  Special attention is paid to trip generation and includes how to use the ITE tables, pass-by trips, and internal capture.  The completion of the course will increase the participants understanding of traffic impact studies.  

This course is designed for transportation engineers, traffic engineers, and planners concerned about the impacts of site impact development. 

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Storm Sewer Systems and Pavement Drainage

(Request this course)
Description
This two-day course provides students with a thorough knowledge of surface pavement drainage design and hydraulic design of storm sewer systems. The course includes a brief review of hydrology for pavements, detailed information on sizing curb open inlets, grates, and curb and gutter flow. One day is spent on sizing storm sewers, computing energy losses and hydraulic grade line calculations. Example problems are performed using monographs and calculators (bring your calculator!)

This course is intended for engineers, consultants, designers, technicians, and planners involved with the design of stormsewer facilities, review of plans submitted by consultants and developers, or those responsible for policy related issues. Those involved in other areas of drainage who would like to obtain a better understanding of the design practices are also encouraged to attend. The course will benefit individuals who are new to this field as well as those with much experience.

Students should have some algebra and trigonometry skills, and bring: pencils, a straightedge, and a calculator (scientific functions are helpful but not required).

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.

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Stormwater and Erosion Sediment Control

(Request this course)
Description
Course will deal with design and construction of erosion and sediment control and stormwater management BMP’s. The course will focus on the design elements for most construction sites disturbing more than one acre of land. The course covers NPDES construction permit requirements, design procedures, available resources for design and other regulatory requirements. Also included are examples of drawings and text. The course emphasizes selection and design of appropriate erosion and sediment control, temporary and permanent best management practices (BMPs), proper location of BMPs, and application of bid quantity/payment items. Examples and exercises in the class include road, linear, residential, and commercial construction operations. The course will also cover maintenance and is designed for those who inspect, maintain or direct maintenance on stormwater control measures and practices, such as ponds and infiltration systems.  Attendees will learn the fundamentals of BMP processes, mechanics, operations and maintenance needs, and how to create and execute a maintenance work plan.

Who should attend: Parks/public works staff, consultants (designers/engineers),  private contractors, stormwater managers, private land owners (big and small properties), property managers/HOA, BMP/project designers, and/or anyone with stormwater BMP responsibilities

Professional Development Hours: 6.0


Stormwater Management - Erosion and Sediment Control

Design of construction stormwater pollution plans focusing on the stormwater polution prevention plan (SWPPP) design elements for most construction sites disturbing more than one acre of land. The course covers National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) construction permit requirements, design procedures and other regulatory requirements. The course emphasizes selection and design of appropriate temporary and permanent best management practices (BMPs) and proper location of BMPs. Examples and exercises in the class include road, linear, residental, and commercial construction operations.

Audience: Engineers, planners, inspectors, contractors, municpal, county and/or state employees who are invovled in the design specifications, construction, maintenance and regulatory issues related to stormwater management and watershed protection. 

Professional Development Hours: 4.0


Strategies for Improving Highway Safety

(Request this course)
Description
To acquaint the participants with the options available to reduce traffic congestion and increase mobility. The course will examine the causes behind the growing congestion problem and specific strategies that can be taken to reduce it. This two-day seminar is intended for local transportation officials, primarily highway and traffic engineers, involved with the planning and design of highway facilities. An engineering background is not required. An optional third day includes a hands-on workshop, where participants apply the strategies learned.

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.


Techniques for Reducing Construction and Maintenance Costs

(Request this course)
Description
Counties and municipalities bear a considerable financial burden with respect to the construction and maintenance of roadways. Inflation, increasing cost of labor, materials and fuel have risen steeply in the past few years. At the same time, municipal budgets have not kept pace. It is essential to conserve resources, find energy efficient and low maintenance materials and to use more efficient techniques. This workshop instructed by Ed Stellfox, will conclude with groups of participants developing a cost control plan for a project.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

(Request this course)
Description
Maybe you have heard about The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People – the best-seller business book.Now you have a chance to attend two days of training based on this same book. This training experience lead by Kim Carr provides the foundation to strengthen the human side of performance at the personal, managerial, and organizational levels. This program equips employees with the tools and skills to work at the highest levels of effectiveness, both with and through others. The content of this training helps build stronger organizations by strengthening and exercising the character and competence of the individuals within them. During the workshop, you’ll experience interactive exercises, case studies, and poignant video segments, and learn from the experiences of other participants.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Tort Liability & Risk Management

(Request this course)
Description
This workshop instructed by Ronald Eck provides an overview of the legal duties and responsibilities of roadway personnel. Key legal concepts relating to the liability of roadway agencies are reviewed from a risk management standpoint. Common types of claims/lawsuits brought against street departments and highway agencies are identified through examples/case studies. Risk management principles and practical risk management activities will be identified.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Traffic Calming

(Request this course)
Description
The Maryland Transportation Technology (T2) Center is offering this 1-day training seminar instructed by Dane Ismart on the principles and practices of Traffic Calming. This Traffic Calming seminar is designed to present a broad-based understanding of traffic calming philosophy and measures while recognizing and preserving the function of roadways. This course is adapted toward state and local government officials and employees who are charged with enhancing roadway safety.

The seminar will focus on the appropriateness and effectiveness of various traffic calming measures as well as the specifics of designing such measures to achieve their desired effect. Audio-visual presentation materials will be used, and attendees will also participate in interactive workshops where case studies are evaluated and appropriate traffic calming solutions are developed. Upon completion of the workshop sessions, the participants will present their solutions to the class. The goal of the course is that participants will leave with a basic understanding of what traffic calming is, and what issues are typically encountered when using traffic calming techniques. Students will receive a course notebook.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.

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Traffic Engineering Fundamentals

(This course is scheduled for October 2-5, 2017)
Description
This course instructed by Dane Ismart and Juan M. Morales, P.E. condenses what was the five-day Traffic Engineering Short Course into a new four-day course.

Agenda Day One:
  • 8:30AM Introduction
  • 9:00AM Traffic Engineering Terms and Design Year Traffic
  • 9:45AM Break
  • 10:00AM Site Impact Analysis
  • 12:00PM Lunch
  • 1:15PM Safety Principles and Crash Principles
  • 2:30PM Break
  • 2:45PM Principles of Access Management
  • 4:15PM Adjourn

Agenda Day Two:

  • 8:30AM Intersection Analysis and Geometrics
  • 10:00AM Break
  • 10:15AM Signal Timing
  • 12:00PM Lunch
  • 1:15PM Arterial and Freeway Analysis
  • 2:45PM Break
  • 3:00PM MUTCD
  • 4:15PM Adjourn

Agenda Day Three:

  • 8:30AM Roundabout Basics
  • 9:30AM Break
  • 9:45AM ITS Overview
  • 10:45AM Break
  • 11:00AM Traffic Calming
  • 12:15PM Lunch
  • 1:30PM Pedestrian Safety
  • 2:45PM Break
  • 3:00PM ADA Accessibility
  • 4:15PM Adjourn

Agenda Day Four:

  • 8:30AM Temporary Traffic Control Standards and Guidelines
  • 9:30AM Break
  • 9:45AM Component Part of a TTC Zone
  • 10:45AM Break
  • 11:00AM Traffic Control Devices
  • 12:15PM Lunch
  • 1:30PM Traffic Control Devices, continued
  • 2:45PM Break
  • 3:00PM Work Zone Impact Analysis
  • 4:15PM Adjorn

Audience: This course is geared towards anyone with an engineering background and/or traffic engineering responsibilities in a related field. Also junior level traffic engineers, transportation planners, highway designers and city/county engineers.

Professional Development Hours: 24.0.


Traffic Engineering Short Course

(Request this course)
Description
This five-day short course covers many aspects of traffic engineering, including design, data analysis, operation and management. Also, related factors, such as road use characteristics, public influence and traffic calming are addressed in the class. The course is designed for persons with an engineering background and/or traffic engineering responsibilities in a related field. Junior level traffic engineers, transportation planners, highway designers, city/county engineers without traffic engineering background, and possibly some experienced traffic technicians will benefit from the class. Materials include a student workbook and “Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering,” a publication by ITS, Berkley. 

The following topics will be covered:

  • Introduction to Traffic Engineering
  • Traffic Calming & Local Traffic Management Essential Skills for Traffic Engineers
  • Traffic Characteristics, Operations & Management of Transportation Systems Elements
  • Traffic Control Devices, Traffic Signals & Control Systems
  • Traffic Data Collection & Analysis
  • Approaches to Traffic and Transportation Management
  • Road User (Transportation) Characteristics

Professional Development Hours: 35.0.

** Please note, this course has been replaced with the above Traffic Engineering Fundamentals. If there is a topic covered in this description that is of interest to you, but is not listed in the Traffic Engineering Fundamentals, please let us know, we can work with you and the instructors to see if your topic of interest can be included. **


Traffic Signs

(Request this course)
Description
This half-day course instructed by Ed Stellfox  will cover the regulations and guidelines for traffic signs including; regulatory signs, warning signs, and guide signs. A review of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) will also be covered. An in depth discussion of sign examples, installation and maintenance, as well as sign management will be covered.

Professional Development Hours: 4.0.


Traffic Sign Installation & Inspection

(Request this course)
Description
This one-day course instructed by Mark Hood will cover the basics of traffic signs: using the appropriate rules and regulations to select and apply appropriate traffic signs, as well as proper installation and maintenance techniques. Participants will learn the importance of and the basic rules for signing, inspection techniques for sign installations, and maintenance procedures for sign faces and supports. This course was designed for technicians, supervisors, & crew involved in sign assembly, installation, maintenance, inspection, or management.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Traffic Sign Retroreflectivity

(Request this course)
Description
To provide nighttime sign visibility, most signs are made from retroreflective sheeting.  Retroreflectivity is the property of a material that re-directs light back to the originating source.  The Federal Highway Administration has adopted new traffic sign retroreflectivity requirements that are included as Revision 2 of the 2003 Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD).  To comply with the new requirements, public agencies have until January 2012 to implement and then continue to use an assessment or management method that is designed to maintain traffic sign retroreflectivity at or above the minimum levels specified.  Five assessment or management methods are defined in the MUTCD as acceptable maintenance methods for traffic signs. This workshop instructed by Ronald Eck, is intended for those directly involved in sign maintenance, particularly sign retroreflectivity.  Participants will be “walked through” the assessment techniques available for conducting sign maintenance with respect to retroreflectivity.  Specific objectives of the workshop are to: review the new MUTCD requirements, understand sign inspection methods that can be used to evaluate sign retroreflectivity in compliance with the new requirements, and learn traffic sign inspection techniques that can assess sign retroreflectivity.

This workshop is aimed at roadway agency personnel who install and maintain signs and who want to learn more about the assessment methods that can be used to comply with the new MUTCD requirements.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.

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Transportation Asset Management

(Request this course)
Description
This course instructed by Alan Kercher introduces the main elements of transportation asset management (TAM). TAM provides the framework and management tools necessary to cost-effectively deal with the ever-increasing inventory of aging roadways, bridges and roadside infrastructure.  Deteriorating infrastructure coupled with the dramatic fluctuations in construction costs, the retirement of experienced transportation workers, and the increased competition for available funding is overwhelming many public works agencies. TAM provides agencies with the tools to save money by systematically selecting the right repair at the right time at the right location in order to minimize the life-cycle costs of assets while increasing the level of service. This course will cover the processes and tools necessary to help transportation agencies document asset conditions, optimize allocation of resources, and determine the most effective use of available funds. A main emphasis of the course will be a focus on how to successfully implement a TAM system to ensure that all levels of an agency are making informed decisions, both short-term and long-term that will improve the overall operational efficiency of the organization.  The course also illustrates available tools to support the use of TAM in any public agency and provides guidelines for the implementation of these principles. The workshop audience ranges from managers, engineers and planners to road crew supervisors.  Others who would benefit include: elected officials and state DOT personnel.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Trenching Safety

(Request this course)
Description
Anytime anyone excavates a trench, safety should be a number one priority. This course discusses the inherent dangers of trenching operations and outlines the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) rules and regulations on construction excavation. Recognizing the potential cave-in factors, identifying soils, using proper sloping and shoring techniques, and backfilling are all discussed, along with pneumatic and hydraulic shoring systems. A review and work problems using OSHA’s timber shoring charts gives the participants knowledge and use of this valuable resource. A review of work zone traffic control and the one-call system (Miss Utility) will also be presented. The session will close with discussions on the importance of a qualified inspector and recordkeeping.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Understanding Road Design and Maintenance

(Request this course)
Description
This course instructed by Ed Stellfox is the first step in understanding the problems that a Municipal Road department faces on a daily basis. This course designed for elected officials conveys an understanding of design and maintenance of municipal roads that will make your life easier when dealing with Road Superintendents, Public Works Directors, Foremen, etc. It also gives elected officials a better understanding of what is involved in a road and street budget. This is an excellent course for: Municipal elected/appointed officials, road commissioners, supervisors, and city or town managers.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Winter Maintenance

(This course is scheduled for October 25, 2017)
Description
This course covers all aspects of winter operations- planning and organizing, methods of snow and ice control, salt usage, and winter equipment maintenance. Instructed by Ed Stellfox this lesson will include usage of snow maps, formal snow plans, snow plow and salt spreader operation. This course in intended for municipal officials, road commissioners, supervisors, superintendents, publics works and maintenance personnel, equipment operators, and city or town managers.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.


Work Zone Design

(This course is scheduled for November 7-8, 2017)
Description
The course instructed by Juan M. Morales, P.E. will give participants knowledge of the entire temporary traffic control (TTC) process: planning, design, review, installation, maintenance, and inspection of temporary traffic control for highway work zones. Issues regarding planning, design, review, and operation of temporary traffic control are covered, including pedestrian accessibility, worker safety, human factors, and legal aspects.

The material is based on Part 6 of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) and are modified to address Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) TTC standards and guidelines. 
 
Topics Covered:
  • Introduction to TTTC
  • TTC Standards and Guidelines (MUTCD and MD SHA)
  • Fundamental Principles of Traffic Control
  • Human Factors
  • Component Part of the TTC Zones
  • Traffic Control Devices
  • The Typical Project
    • Planning
    • Design
    • Installation
    • Inspection
    • Enhancements and Modifications
    • Constructability Reviews
    • Removal
  • Traffic Control Plan Strategies
  • MD SHA Standards, Guidelines and Practices
  • Legal Aspects of TTC
  • Workshops

The course is aimed at individuals who are responsible for the design, review, or modification of temporary traffic control for work zones adjacent to and within roads and highways.  The course will also be of interest to those responsible for installation, operation, and inspection.

Professional Development Hours: 12.0.


Work Zone Traffic Control

(Request this course)
Description
This half-day course instructed by Ed Stellfox will discuss the importance of work zone traffic control (WZTC) covering topics such as safety and liability. Regulations and guidelines will also be discussed with topics ranging from traffic control plans, traffic control devices, installation, and flagging procedures. Plan exercise and inspection of work zones will also be covered.

Professional Development Hours: 4.0

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Seal coates, Oil and Chip, Slurry Seals, Microsurfacing and other Methods of Preserving your Asphalt Pavements

(Request this course)
Description
This course is the first step in making your asphalt pavements last longer at lower costs. The course instructed by Ed Stellfox covers preventive maintenance treatments such as chip seals, slurry seals, and micro-surfacing and discusses when and where each technique could be effective. It presents application methods, including preparation, materials, equipment, operations and safety, along with practical tips on how to avoid trouble.
This course is open to municipal officials, road commissioners, supervisors, and superintendents; public works and maintenance personnel; equipment operators; and city or town managers.

Professional Development Hours: 6.0.